What is Symmastia?

Symmastia, commonly known as uni-boob, is a condition caused by displacement of breast implants leaving little or no cleavage. The condition can range from mild displacement, leaving the breasts touching in the midline, to a more severe condition where the breast implant pocket is destroyed in the midline, allowing the implant to move from one side of the chest to the other. Basically, anything that pulls the skin in the midline away from the chest wall can result in symmastia.

Revision Breast Augmentation for Symmastia
Revision Breast Augmentation for Symmastia

 

Common causes of symmastia are:

  • Breast implants that are too wide
  • Over dissection of the implant pocket in the midline

Symmastia is more common when patients have implants placed on top of the muscle, as opposed to those placed totally or partially under the muscle. While implant size itself is not an independent risk factor for symmastia, careful dissection must be performed by the surgeon when placing larger implants.

Revision Breast Augmentation for the treatment of Symmastia

Patients who develop symmastia must have revision breast augmentation for correction. For women with symmastia who have undergone subglandular (over the muscle) augmentation, the condition can be corrected by placing the implants under the muscle. For those with implants under the muscle, a neo-pocket can be created to place the implants in a new pocket and re-enforce the tissues in the midline. Often times, some type of surgical mesh is used to re-enforce the repair.

Dr. Troy Pittman, a board-certified plastic surgeon in Washington, DC, underwent fellowship training in revision breast augmentation. He has specific expertise in correction of symmastia and other conditions related to failed or outdated breast augmentation.

If you suffer from symmastia or other issues related to breast augmentation call Dr. Pittman’s office at 202.810.7700 to schedule your complimentary consultation.

You can also schedule your consultation online by clicking here